Are You Paying Too Much for Common Repairs?

 Are You Paying Too Much for Common Repairs?

Are You Paying Too Much for Common Repairs?

The things most likely to break in your home and how much they typically cost.

 

Congratulations on buying your first house. Now, you have to learn how to keep it in good repair. 

Most repairs are simple, inexpensive, and DIY-friendly. If you can fix stuff yourself, you’ll only pay for the cost of materials and save a bundle on these common repairs and replacements.

But if a pro is your preference, here’s how much it typically costs for the 10 most common repairs.

#1 Replace Toilet Fill Valves

That annoying sound of water continually filling and draining from your toilet tank is often caused by leaky fill valve, which a plumber can replace, stopping water waste and restoring quiet. Plumber rates vary widely around the country, from $45 to $150 per hour, and the job will take about two hours — the minimum some plumbers require just to take the job.

  • Labor: $50 to $200
  • Materials: $11 to $23
  • Total: $61 to $223

#2 Repair a Leaky Faucet

The water torture drip-drip-drip from a leaky faucet won’t just drive you insane, it can drive up water bills, too. Depending on the type of faucet you have, fixes typically involve replacing damaged rubber washers (10 for $2), O-rings (10 for $2), or a faucet cartridge ($8 to $30).

  • Labor: $95 to $300
  • Materials: $2 to $30
  • Total: $97 to $330

#3 Replace Ceiling Fan

If you’ve got a ceiling fan, sooner or later the motor will burn out, the blades will warp, and fashions will change, so you’ll need to replace it. Replacing isn’t a big deal, because upgraded wiring, a reinforced ceiling box, and a light switch with ceiling fan controls are already in place. What you’re paying for is an electrician’s time — one or two hours — and a new fixture.

  • Labor: $50 to $200
  • Materials: $54 to $1,000 and up
  • Total: $104 to $1,200

#4 Repair Drywall

Nicks, gashes, and smashes inevitably mar your beautiful walls. You’ll have to patch and paint to make them look as good as new. A painter can do both jobs and will probably give you a flat rate that will include patching or filling blemishes, then sanding, priming, and painting.

Painters charge $25 to $62 per hour for labor or $2.68 to $4.60 per square foot including materials. Figure it will take about three hours to repair a wall, including drying time for the patching compound and paint. It’s a good idea to save up painting chores so you have enough to keep a painter busy while repairs cure.

Materials include paint at $12 to $50 or more a gallon, which should cover about 350 square feet; plus another $10 to $50 for brushes, rollers, drop clothes, and drywall patching compound.

  • Labor: $75 to $186
  • Materials: $22 to $100
  • Total: $97 to $286

#5 Repair Cracked Tile

Tile is hard and durable, but drop something heavy on it and it’s likely to crack — a reason to always order more tile than you need so you’ll always have spares. To replace cracked tiles, a handyman must pry out the damaged tiles, scrape away old fixative, re-glue new tiles, and spread new grout. Replacing a 2-foot-by-2-foot section of tile should take one to two hours, not including the drying time required for the adhesive to set.

  • Labor: $30 to $125 per hour; with possible $150 to $350 minimum charge for a handyman
  • Materials: $1 to $20 per square foot
  • Total: $34 to $430

#6 Replace Caulk Around Tubs, Sinks, and Showers

Caulk is the waterproof seal around sinks, tubs, and showers that prevents moisture from seeping through gaps and onto drywall and flooring. When caulk cracks or peels, it should be replaced immediately to prevent mold and rot.

A handyman can dig out old caulk around a tub and reseal with new in about an hour.

  • Labor: $30 to $125 per hour; with possible $150 to $350 minimum charge for a handyman
  • Materials:  $1 to $4 for a tube of bathroom caulk
  • Total: $31 to $354

#7 Fix Gutters

Gutters and downspouts carry water from rain and snow away from your house and onto the ground. Sometimes the weight of wet snow and soggy leaves puts too much pressure on gutters, causing them to pull away from the house or pitch at inefficient angles.

A gutter contractor will clean gutters, and replace or reinstall supportive hardware and hangers. To restore the correct pitch, the contractor must detach and reattach each gutter section.

  • Labor: $127 to $282 (depending on length of gutter)
  • Materials: $10 for five hangers; $6 to $9 for gutter sealant
  • Total: $143 to $301

#8 Fix Out-of-Alignment Doors

Over time, your house moves as its foundation settles and building materials expand and contract with changes in humidity. The movement often is noticed when doorframes shift slightly, causing hinges to creak and doors to not shut properly.

Adding wooden shims to frames and hinges can bring doors back into alignment and let them easily open and close once again. Replacing worn-out screws with longer screws helps secure hinges tightly.

A handyman can fix a door in about an hour. Materials will include shims and screws.

  • Labor: $30 to $125 per hour; with possible $150 to $350 minimum charge for a handyman
  • Materials: $5
  • Total: $35 to $355

#9 Repair Ice Damming

If your house isn’t insulated correctly or your roof isn’t designed correctly, melting roof snowcan run off and freeze around roof edges. Eventually, this can form an ice dam that creeps up your roof, damaging shingles and forcing melting water into your home.

One popular solution to ice damming is to install a heating cable along the roof’s edge, which warms the area and prevents freezing. It’s not a DIY job. Roofing contractors will install the cable, and an electrician will install outlets that will juice up the cable. If you want a thermostat to turn the cable on and off automatically, that’ll be extra, too.

  • Labor and materials: $30 to $60 per linear foot
  • Total: $371 to $1,319 (average job cost)

#10 Fix a Faulty Light Switch

Sometimes you turn on the light but nothing happens; or sparks crackle, and the light turns on. It’s disconcerting, but most likely it’s an easy fix. An electrician will turn off the power, take off the faceplate, check and perhaps tighten wires; or replace the switch. All told, it will take less than an hour.

Labor: $50 to $100 per hour

Materials: $1 to $6 for a single pole light switch

Total: $41 to $106

#RealEstate #RealEstateAgent #RealEstateMiami #RealEstateSouthFlorida

#SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateExpert #homeselling 

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Much Has Your Home Increased In Value Over The Last Year?

How Much Has Your Home Increased In Value Over The Last Year?

How Much Has Your Home Increased In Value Over The Last Year?

There are many unsubstantiated theories as to why home values are continuing to increase. From those who are worried that lending standards are again becoming too lenient (data shows this is untrue), to those who are concerned that prices are again approaching boom peaks because of “irrational exuberance” (this is also untrue as prices are not at peak levels when they are adjusted for inflation), there seems to be no shortage of opinion.

However, the increase in prices is easily explained by the theory of supply & demand. Whenever there is a limited supply of an item that is in high demand, prices increase.

It is that simple. In real estate, it takes a six-month supply of existing salable inventory to maintain pricing stability. In most housing markets, anything less than six months will cause home values to appreciate and anything more than seven months will cause prices to depreciate (see chart below).

Why Home Prices Are Increasing

 

According to the Existing Home Sales Report from the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the monthly inventory of homes for sale has been below six months for the last five years (see chart below).

Why Home Prices Are Increasing

Bottom Line

If buyer demand continues to outpace the current supply of existing homes for sale, prices will continue to appreciate. Nothing nefarious is taking place. It is simply the theory of supply & demand working as it should.

#RealEstate #RealEstateAgent #RealEstateMiami #RealEstateSouthFlorida

#SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateExpert #homeselling 

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NORTH MIAMI BEACH REAL ESTATE BIGGEST SALES (07-26-19)

07-26-19 North Miami Beach 2

 

NORTH MIAMI BEACH REAL ESTATE BIGGEST SALES

*as of July 27, 2019

07-26-19 North Miami Beach 1

WE HAVE THE KEY TO YOUR DREAM HOME. CHECK OUT REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES FOR SALE IN NORTH MIAMI BEACH .

Call now for real estate inquiries! 305-741-2142 or visit www.ralphmagin.com

#RealEstateMiami #SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateNorthMiamiBeach #NorthMiamiBeachRealEstate

 

Laurenzo’s Italian Center

Popular family-owned Italian market Laurenzo’s is closing. ‘People can’t believe it.’

By Howard Cohen

“If you want to experience Little Italy without having to go to New York, Laurenzo’s Italian Center in North Miami Beach is the place to go,” the Miami Herald said in 2005.

That’s been the case since Laurenzo’s market opened at 16385 W. Dixie Hwy. 69 years ago, in 1951: steaming, aromatic plates of spaghetti and meatballs or anchovies, gooey, tangy lasagna and eggplant Parmesan, thick Sicilian pizza. You could take it all home, too, with grocery bags stuffed with olive oil, pasta and red wine.

But come July 31, Laurenzo’s enters the history books. The popular Italian food market closes its doors at month’s end, the Miami New Times first reported Saturday.

“They are selling the place,” said Cristy Marten, who works at the store’s deli. “Everybody is not going to have a job. They just told us yesterday. People can’t believe it. They are sad.”

Customers, too, she said.

Laurenzo’s Italian Center

Marten said she’s worked at Laurenzo’s only for a year. “But people have been here 20 years, 30 years.”

When Frank Sinatra sang to packed rooms along hotel row on Collins Avenue in the 1950s and early ‘60s and wanted something like his mama’s “Sunday gravy,” the 20th century’s most famous Italian-American stopped by Laurenzo’s — or had one of his posse pop over — for something good to go.

 

Patrons found out about the coming closing as they strolled by the front door where owners David, Carol and Robert Laurenzo posted a sign to its “Valued Customers” that read:

 

“We would like to announce our retirement and the closing of Laurenzo’s Italian Market effective July 31, 2019. Although we are excited to begin this new chapter in our lives, we will miss being a part of yours. For 69 years, our market has thrived due to the loyalty and support of our wonderful customers. Thank you for your patronage and your friendship. Wishing you good health and happiness in the years to come! Please continue to visit Laurenzo’s Farmers Market for all your fresh produce needs.”

 

Credit Source: Miami Herald

#RealEstateMiami #SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateNorthMiamiBeach #NorthMiamiBeachRealEstate

Check out homes for sale in North Miami Beach. Contact Ralph Magin, your trusted real estate agent, at 305-741-2142 or visit http://ralphmagin.com/ for real estate inquiries.

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Not to Do as a New Homeowner

What Not to Do as a New Homeowner

What Not to Do as a New Homeowner

 

Avoid these easy-to-prevent mistakes that could cost you big time.

 

You’ve finally settled into your new home.

You’re hanging pictures and pinning ideas for your favorite bath. 

But in all your excitement, are you missing something? Now that you’re a bonafide homeowner are there things you should know that you don’t?

Probably so. Here are six mistakes new homeowners often make, and why they’re critically important to avoid.

#1 Not Knowing Where the Main Water Shutoff Valve Is

Water from a burst or broken plumbing pipe can spew dozens of gallons into your home’s interior in a matter of minutes, soaking everything in sight — including drywall, flooring, and valuables. In fact, water damage is one of the most common of all household insurance claims.

Quick-twitch reaction is needed to stave off a major bummer. Before disaster hits, find your water shutoff valve, which will be located where a water main enters your house. Make sure everyone knows where it’s located and how to close the valve. A little penetrating oil on the valve stem makes sure it’ll work when you need it to.

#2 Not Calling 811 Before Digging a Hole

Ah, spring! You’re so ready to dig into your new yard and plant bushes and build that fence. But don’t — not until you’ve dialed 811, the national dig-safely hotline. The hotline will contact all your local utilities who will then come to your property — often within a day — to mark the location of underground pipes, cables, and wires.

This free service keeps you safe and helps avoid costly repairs. In many states, calling 811 is the law, so you’ll also avoid fines.

#3 Not Checking the Slope of Foundation Soil

The ground around your foundation should slope away from your house at least 6 inches over 10 feet. Why? To make sure that water from rain and melting snow doesn’t soak the soil around your foundation walls, building up pressure that can cause leaks and crack your foundation, leading to mega-expensive repairs.

This kind of water damage doesn’t happen overnight — it’s accumulative — so the sooner you get after it, the better (and smarter) you’ll be. While you’re at it, make sure downspouts extend at least 5 feet away from your house.

#4 Not Knowing the Depth of Attic Insulation

This goes hand-in-hand with not knowing where your attic access is located, so let’s start there. Find the ceiling hatch, typically a square area framed with molding in a hallway or closet ceiling. Push the hatch cover straight up. Get a ladder and check out the depth of the insulation. If you can see the tops of joists, you definitely don’t have enough.

The recommended insulation for most attics is about R-38 or 10 to 14 inches deep, depending on the type of insulation you choose. BTW, is your hatch insulated, too? Use 4-inch-thick foam board glued to the top.

#5 Carelessly Drilling into Walls

Hanging shelves, closet systems, and artwork means drilling into your walls — but do you know what’s back there? Hidden inside your walls are plumbing pipes, ductwork, wires, and cables.

You can check for some stuff with a stud sensor — a $25 battery-operated tool that detects changes in density to sniff out studs, cables, and ducts.

But stud sensors aren’t foolproof. Protect yourself by drilling only 1¼ inches deep max — enough to clear drywall and plaster but not deep enough to reach most wires and pipes.

Household wiring runs horizontally from outlet to outlet about 8 inches to 2 feet from the floor, so that’s a no-drill zone. Stay clear of vertical locations above and below wall switches — wiring runs along studs to reach switches.

#6 Cutting Down a Tree

The risk isn’t worth it. Even small trees can fall awkwardly, damaging your house, property, or your neighbor’s property. In some locales, you have to obtain a permit first. Cutting down a tree is an art that’s best left to a professional tree service.

Plus, trees help preserve property values and provide shade that cuts energy bills. So think twice before going all Paul Bunyan.

#RealEstate #RealEstateAgent #RealEstateMiami #RealEstateSouthFlorida

#SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateExpert #homeselling 

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Homeownership: “The Reports Of My Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated”

Homeownership: “The Reports Of My Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated”

Homeownership: “The Reports Of My Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated”

 

The famous quote by Mark Twain in the title of this article can be used to describe homeownership in America today. Last week, the Census revealed that the percentage of homeowners in the country increased for the first time in thirteen years.

Homeownership: “The Reports Of My Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated”

A story in the Wall Street Journal gave these new homeownership numbers some context:

“The annual increase marks a crucial turning point because it comes after the federal government reined in bubble-era policies that encouraged banks to ease lending standards to boost homeownership. This time, what’s driving the market is a shift in favor of owning rather than renting.

‘This is market, market and market…There’s no government incentive program in sight that is having this effect,’ said Susan Wachter, a professor of real estate and finance at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, ‘This is back to basics.’”

In a separate report comparing the rental population in America to the homeowner population, RentCaféalso concluded that the gap is now shrinking.

“Undoubtedly, the recession had a great impact on homeownership…However, it looks like it takes more to discourage Americans from buying a house than that.

As the years go by, it seems more and more certain that the fact that renting has seen a sudden gain in popularity is more a reaction to the economic crisis than a paradigm shift in the Americans’ attitude toward housing.”

America’s belief in homeownership was also evidenced in a recent survey by Pew Research. They asked consumers “How important is homeownership to achieving the American Dream?”

The results:

  • 43% said homeownership was essential to the American Dream
  • 48% said homeownership was important to the American Dream
  • Only 9% said it was not important

Bottom Line

Homeownership has been, is and will always be a crucial element of the American Dream.

#RealEstate #RealEstateAgent #RealEstateMiami #RealEstateSouthFlorida

#SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateExpert #homeselling 

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NORTH MIAMI KEYSTONE SANS SOUCI REAL ESTATE BIGGEST SALES (07-19-19)

07-19-19 North Miami 1

NORTH MIAMI KEYSTONE SANS SOUCI REAL ESTATE BIGGEST SALES

*as of  July 19,  2019

07-19-19 North Miami 2

WE HAVE THE KEY TO YOUR DREAM HOME. CHECK OUT REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES FOR SALE IN NORTH MIAMI KEYSTONE SANS SOUCI .

Call now for real estate inquiries! 305-741-2142 or visit www.ralphmagin.com

#RealEstateMiami #SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateNorthMiamiKeystone #NorthMiamiKeystoneRealEstate

Check out homes for sale in North Miami Keystone Sans Souci. Contact Ralph Magin, your trusted real estate agent, at 305-741-2142 or visit http://ralphmagin.com/ for real estate inquiries.

A Huge Indoor Go Kart Park is Opening in Miami’s Biggest Entertainment Complex

A Huge Indoor Go Kart Park is Opening in Miami’s Biggest Entertainment Complex

BY MADELEINE MARR

 

Get these two words out of your head: Ninja Lounge.

 

The indoor entertainment center in North Miami is officially called Dezerland Park, after its developer Michael Dezer, and has been operating since January of this year, thank you very much.

 

The massive space in North Miami still includes many of Ninja Lounge’s much loved attractions, including the trampoline park, ninja warrior obstacle course, and rock climbing wall, but there’s more. So much more.

2019 07-19 Karting 2

The second floor houses a sprawling virtual reality center and downstairs, a massive arcade that could give GameWorks a run for its money.

 

Across the street, you’ll no longer find the Miami Auto Museum, Dezer’s awesome collection of classic cars, which has since decamped to Orlando. In its place, Karting Miami. The 80,000 square foot electric go kart track holds its grand opening on Friday starting at 10 a.m.

 

Karting Miami offers the “latest in cutting edge electric racing technology” on two separate tracks, the so-called adult track, for those at least 58 inches tall, the other for those at least 48 inches high. The vehicles, powered by lithium ion batteries (as opposed to gas powered), can zoom up to 40 mph, says spokesman Mark Burns. He adds the kids’ cadet versions go up to 30 mph.

“Karting Miami has the longest indoor junior track in Florida as well as dual tracks for adults and juniors that are a combined 1300 feet of karting excitement.”

The sprawling, art adorned space also features bumper cars, racing simulators, a mini arcade, cafe, and three party rooms with windows that overlook the action.

Details: Karting Miami, 14401 NE 19th Ave., North Miami; single race tickets from $15, including helmet rental. No flip flops.

Credit Source: Miami Herald; Madelein Marr

 

#RealEstateMiami #SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateNorthMiamiKeystoneMiami #NorthMiamiKeystoneRealEstate

Check out homes for sale in North Miami. Contact Ralph Magin, your trusted real estate agent, at 305-741-2142 or visit http://ralphmagin.com/ for real estate inquiries.

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How We Bought a New House Before Selling Our Current House

How We Bought a New House Before Selling Our Current House

How We Bought a New House Before Selling Our Current House

And used a VA loan, which has more restrictions than a conventional one.

Name: Jena and Mark Boomhower, both 36

City: Battle Ground, Wash.

Year of Home Purchase: 2018

Sale Price: $412,000

Home style: 2014 modern Craftsman single-family home

Profession: Jena is a medical technician; Mark is a supervisor for TSA

Mark and Jena Boomhower’s 1,400-square-foot starter home was just right when their daughters, Tanahleigh and Adalyn, were tots. But as the girls got older, Mark and Jena realized they needed a bigger house and yard. They wanted a two-story farther from the city, but there were a few challenges.

First, they had to figure out how to buy a house before selling their current house. Second challenge: Buying a house with a VA loan. VA loans offer competitive interest rates and don’t always require a down payment or private mortgage insurance. But VA loans limit what buyers are allowed to pay in closing costs, and sellers don’t necessarily have to pay them, either. Closing costs become a big part of the negotiation. Here’s their story.

  • The Boomhower Family’s Story

When did you realize you needed more square footage?

Mark: When Tanahleigh started having her friends over. If they all wanted to watch TV in the living room, we had to go to another room. I would go hang out in the garage. Jena would hang out in the kitchen. We were like, “OK, we’re stepping on each other in this little house.”

So what’s the first thing you did to escape your exile in the garage?

Mark: I called our agent and told him our plan: that we wanted to buy a new house but not until we sold our current house. And that we wouldn’t sell our current house until we had one to move into because we didn’t want to spend weeks or months in a hotel with two kids and a dog. And we wanted to buy with a VA loan. Our agent said that our stipulations were tough but that it could be done.

You faced a seller’s market. Houses were going fast. What did you do first: shop for a new house or list your old one?

Mark: We started looking at houses. We looked at three or four. The last one we looked at, I don’t think Jena stopped smiling after we walked through the front door.

Jena: Yes. It was perfect.

How perfect was it?

Mark: So perfect that we put an offer on it, even though our old house wasn’t even listed.

This all sounds so simple. Did they take the offer?

Mark: No.

Jena: They countered at a higher price. They were asking $409,000. We offered $400,000 with $10,000 in closing costs. They came back at $418,000 with $10,000 in closing costs. They raised the price to cover closing costs.

Mark: We thought it was ridiculous.

Jena: We walked away.

Oh no, those VA loans and their non-allowable fees! It was your perfect house! 

Jena: We went through the whole weekend and couldn’t get the house off our minds.

Mark: We talked to our agent, Dale Chumbley. We talked with our lender. We realized we would have to pay a higher price for the house and less of the closing costs, or a lower price for the house and more of the closing costs.

Jena: We went with paying more for the house and less of the closing costs. So we made another offer: $410,000 + $7,000 closing costs. We wanted to walk away with the most bucks in our pocket, so we went with them paying more of the closing costs.

Did this offer go better?

Jena: Yes. They countered with $412,000 plus $7,000 in closing costs.

Mark: We weren’t going to lose the house over $2,000. Jena crunched the numbers, and it would add less than $50 a month to our payment. So we took the offer.

Great! You got the house! But you still had to sell your house. With the same agent, right?

Jena: Right. Our offer was contingent on us selling our old house in 30 days. And once the seller accepted our offer, we had 48 hours to get our house on the market.

Mark: So we had two days to get our house ready to sell. We picked up, cleaned up, threw things out. It was a tornado of excitement and anxiety. But we got it done and were ready for showings.

The clock was ticking. You had 30 days to sell. How did it go?

Mark: We weren’t getting many showings, even though it was a seller’s market. We had just two people come by the first week. We were in full-blown panic mode. We were worried because we could lose the new house while we waited for our house to sell. [Under regional MLS rules], if someone came by with a better offer for the new house during the 30 days, the seller could accept it. So we were worried.

Jena: After about two and a half weeks, we finally got an offer — a little under what we were asking, but they were buying with a VA loan, too, so we took a lower price and they paid closing costs the VA wouldn’t cover.

On what day of the 30-day period did your old house sell?

Jena: Day 24.

You did that with a week to spare!

Mark: Everything had to be perfect for this to work. It seemed like an ordeal to us. Our agent said it went really smooth. He said he’d never seen a transaction line up like ours did. We wouldn’t have stayed sane through it all without him telling us it would work out and telling us what we should do.

What’s your advice to a home buyer facing a similar situation?

Jena: Be patient.

Mark: Make sure you have a competent agent, one you can trust.

Jena: The agent we worked with, Dale, sold us our first house.

Mark: He became a family friend. He bought, I’m not kidding, hundreds of boxes of Girl Scout cookies from my daughter.

Jena: We totally trusted him and everything he said.

#RealEstate #RealEstateAgent #RealEstateMiami #RealEstateSouthFlorida

#SouthFloridaRealEstate #RealEstateExpert #homeselling 

Ralph Magin, GRI, CRB, Broker Associate
Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate
40 Years Experience Over 3,000 Homes Sold
305-741-2142 – RalphMagin@yahoo.com – www.RalphMagin.com

Facebook Twitter Follow Me on Pinterest Wordpress + on Googleplus ACTIVE RAIN NEW

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment